Question for the Omark experts

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KHGS
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Re: Question for the Omark experts

#31 Postby KHGS » Thu Sep 06, 2018 8:51 am

Bigtravoz wrote:
KHGS wrote:
Bigtravoz wrote:
If 1 thou allows brass to “flow” so be it! That’s such an incorrect term! If it was going to expand to fill the one thou depression it would more than definitely have been able to depress the ejector deeper than that.


What I & others have been saying!! What is the incorrect term that you refer to?
Keith H.


The incorrect term I was talking about is brass flowing. It isn’t water it doesn’t flow.


Actually you are wrong, in the world of guns, gunsmithing & advanced reloading "brass flow" is the correct term for for what we have been discussing. Like "pierced" primers, which is an incorrect term, should be "blanked" primers!!!!!!
Keith H.
Geriatric Gunsmith.

pjifl
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Location: Innisfail, Far North QLD.

Re: Question for the Omark experts

#32 Postby pjifl » Thu Sep 06, 2018 10:53 am

Metals are malleable. Under sufficient pressure they flow which is a property of metals specific to the 'metallic' bond between their atoms. It is related to the fact that metals conduct electricity well which allows some of their electrons to easily relocate after flowing - thus still retaining strength after deformation. Non metals only flow when molten, but metals may do so below the melting point. Some metals and alloys are more malleable than others, so are more suited to shaping by presses and extrusion etc. which is the most efficient way to shape metal pieces.
Think about how cartridge cases are made and how bullets are lead filled.
The term 'flow' is not just restricted to firearms. It is a general engineering phenomenon often giving advantages because after flowing the re-crystallization favors the flow direction. Hence high quality bolts, for example, made by high pressure cold working have superior strength. A button rifled barrel is another example of metal flowing. An extreme case of metal flowing is explosive working of metal.
Peter Smith.

Bigtravoz
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Re: Question for the Omark experts

#33 Postby Bigtravoz » Thu Sep 13, 2018 6:07 pm

I will politely agree to disagree, if the metal became molten and was poured it would have flowed, yes brass and other metal are malleable, however pressure forming a metal is more appropriately labeled stretching when it’s forced into a cavity mould. Anyhow I don’t have any “flow” into the ejector cavity which is approximately 1 thou below the bolt face so all is good !

KHGS
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Re: Question for the Omark experts

#34 Postby KHGS » Fri Sep 14, 2018 8:37 am

Bigtravoz wrote:I will politely agree to disagree, if the metal became molten and was poured it would have flowed, yes brass and other metal are malleable, however pressure forming a metal is more appropriately labeled stretching when it’s forced into a cavity mould. Anyhow I don’t have any “flow” into the ejector cavity which is approximately 1 thou below the bolt face so all is good !


By all means you are welcome to agree to disagree, however it will not make you right, white is white & black is black. The reason you are not having brass flow into the ejector hole (pressure indicator) is because your load is not hot for your rifle.
Keith H.
Geriatric Gunsmith.


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