Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

Get or give advice on equipment, reloading and other technical issues.

Moderator: Mod

Message
Author
williada
Posts: 856
Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 12:37 am

Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#1 Postby williada » Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:39 pm

I use original triggers on my Barnard rifles and am happy with those because I am used to a heavier trigger pull which some new shooters may find harder to master. However, I was recently asked "which aftermarket trigger" is most suitable for use with a light trigger pull? I could not speak from experience and had heard rumours, that replacement of a heavier spring with a lighter spring in the Barnard was problematic.

Any views would be appreciated. David.

cheech
Posts: 114
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2009 11:10 pm

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#2 Postby cheech » Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:49 pm

Barnard triggers are not a problem if set up by people who know what they’re doing , mine are light enough and do the job , almost everyone I know think it’s a must have “ light “ , I proved this to someone having trouble with his scores and had his trigger ridiculously light it scared him but was under the impression it was mandatory to succeed. So I made it heavier and his score climbed

RDavies
Posts: 2040
Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 7:23 pm
Location: Singleton NSW

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#3 Postby RDavies » Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:59 pm

I have been using the new trigger made by Marty Lobert, the "16 South" trigger. Though I don't like super light triggers on my 7MMs, the Barnard triggers can get a little "mushy" once they start to wear and round off the edges, which they seem to do after a lot of use. When the Barnard triggers are set to TR and F std weights, they are apparently reliable enough, but once you lighten them off to weights we F Open shooters are used to, they might start giving the occasional accidental discharge.
I don't know the trigger pull weight of my "16 South" trigger, but I would guess around 9oz or so, but no matter how far I cycled the bolt, even on tight case, I was never able to get it to "accidental discharge". Also, it fits straight into an existing Barnard with no mods needed at all.

Tim N
Posts: 1030
Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2013 8:18 pm
Location: Branxton NSW

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#4 Postby Tim N » Thu Sep 19, 2019 2:44 pm

You can put a Jewell trigger on a barnard BUT they don’t sit in the same position and so a new stock might be needed??
I have used the 16 south trigger which is a great bit of gear and easy to fit.
We don't rise to the level of our expectations, we fall to the level of our training. Archilochos 680-645 BC

Barossa_222
Posts: 198
Joined: Sat Feb 08, 2014 6:58 pm
Location: Barossa Valley

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#5 Postby Barossa_222 » Thu Sep 19, 2019 6:25 pm

I was using a Barnard S fitted with a Bix n Andy the other week. Really very very nice and smooth.

shadow
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2018 9:46 pm

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#6 Postby shadow » Thu Sep 19, 2019 6:33 pm

Ive got jewells in mine,beware , tin iz wright about the stock,they sit opprox 18mm further back, light spring kit can lead to slam fires , so to make them safe you end up with creep, cheers

willow
Posts: 249
Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2015 9:51 pm

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#7 Postby willow » Thu Sep 19, 2019 9:24 pm

RDavies wrote:I have been using the new trigger made by Marty Lobert, the "16 South" trigger. Though I don't like super light triggers on my 7MMs, the Barnard triggers can get a little "mushy" once they start to wear and round off the edges, which they seem to do after a lot of use. When the Barnard triggers are set to TR and F std weights, they are apparently reliable enough, but once you lighten them off to weights we F Open shooters are used to, they might start giving the occasional accidental discharge.
I don't know the trigger pull weight of my "16 South" trigger, but I would guess around 9oz or so, but no matter how far I cycled the bolt, even on tight case, I was never able to get it to "accidental discharge". Also, it fits straight into an existing Barnard with no mods needed at all.


How does one buy one of these triggers Rod? I'd be all for buying one if they're available.

RDavies
Posts: 2040
Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 7:23 pm
Location: Singleton NSW

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#8 Postby RDavies » Thu Sep 19, 2019 9:46 pm

willow wrote:
RDavies wrote:I have been using the new trigger made by Marty Lobert, the "16 South" trigger. Though I don't like super light triggers on my 7MMs, the Barnard triggers can get a little "mushy" once they start to wear and round off the edges, which they seem to do after a lot of use. When the Barnard triggers are set to TR and F std weights, they are apparently reliable enough, but once you lighten them off to weights we F Open shooters are used to, they might start giving the occasional accidental discharge.
I don't know the trigger pull weight of my "16 South" trigger, but I would guess around 9oz or so, but no matter how far I cycled the bolt, even on tight case, I was never able to get it to "accidental discharge". Also, it fits straight into an existing Barnard with no mods needed at all.


How does one buy one of these triggers Rod? I'd be all for buying one if they're available.

I will try to get Marty to chime in on here.

Matt P
Posts: 1360
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 8:22 pm

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#9 Postby Matt P » Thu Sep 19, 2019 9:54 pm

willow wrote:
RDavies wrote:I have been using the new trigger made by Marty Lobert, the "16 South" trigger. Though I don't like super light triggers on my 7MMs, the Barnard triggers can get a little "mushy" once they start to wear and round off the edges, which they seem to do after a lot of use. When the Barnard triggers are set to TR and F std weights, they are apparently reliable enough, but once you lighten them off to weights we F Open shooters are used to, they might start giving the occasional accidental discharge.
I don't know the trigger pull weight of my "16 South" trigger, but I would guess around 9oz or so, but no matter how far I cycled the bolt, even on tight case, I was never able to get it to "accidental discharge". Also, it fits straight into an existing Barnard with no mods needed at all.


How does one buy one of these triggers Rod? I'd be all for buying one if they're available.

Paul B has 2 of them if you want to try one, I can source them if you want one.
MattP

Azzopardi
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 1:32 pm
Location: Cairns, QLD

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#10 Postby Azzopardi » Thu Sep 19, 2019 10:05 pm

I've been testing and using Marty's trigger since April. The one trigger in 3 Barnard actions and swap all bolts between actions. One action is 8 years older than the other 2. Didn't need to adjust the trigger once since I stated using it and the weight has never changed. Just unbolt the Barnard trigger and slip the “16 South” straight in. No need to alter the stock. I’ve slammed it but it doesn’t miss fire since the day I’ve adjusted it in April.

I can't be used in Tr and F-Std because you can't get the trigger weight heavy enough.

Now I have 2.

It's mostly stainless steel so rust is not an issue.

At about $340, there great value.
Regards,
Azzo

wsftr
Posts: 110
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2018 12:58 pm

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#11 Postby wsftr » Fri Sep 20, 2019 4:43 am

Can the 16 south be set between 5-7 ounces?
Are they a "crisp" trigger? I have a bix n andy but it needs stock mods.

RonM
Posts: 46
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 8:54 pm
Location: Gold Coast

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#12 Postby RonM » Fri Sep 20, 2019 8:59 am

I also would like to buy one for my Barnard P. how can I order one from Marty?
Thanks,
Ron

Marty
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 5:53 pm

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#13 Postby Marty » Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:15 pm

Hello.

First and foremost, thanks to all those top-tier F Open and FTR shooters who helped with the beta testing of this trigger over the last 12 months. In the areas of performance and environmental resilience this testing has been invaluable! You know who you are, and I thank you!

Whilst there are a great many choices for Remington clone custom actions, there are a lot fewer for Barnards, and practically nil which are a drop in, i.e. do not require the action moved forwards in the stock.

The 16 South trigger is a drop in for a Barnard. If you have your rifle configured with the original trigger, then geometrically this trigger will drop straight in.

Two things to note:
1. They're crisp and light. The weight is not adjustable, so great for F Open and FTR. Pull weight is around 6-8 oz. I'm not making any for FS or TR.
2. On rare occasion, I have seen trigger guards which narrow at the front (see picture below, this picture is with the original trigger). It is unlikely yours does this (and I don't know why some do anyway...) but if so, all it needs is to run a 12mm mill cutter forwards to take out those lips. You can see from the pic they are only about 1 mm thick and is a 5 second job on the mill.

Image
Trig Guard.jpg


Generically speaking, corrosion and dirt ingress are significant considerations with fine mechanisms. The 16 South triggers are constructed such that the hangar, pins, springs, grub screws are all stainless. Side plates are laser cut from stainless and connecting screws are stainless. The internal working components are water jet cut Bisalloy 80 plate which then have further been nitro-carburised. This means that they are case hardened, have higher lubricity, and most importantly, increases corrosion resistance dramatically.

The mechanism is patent pending in the US and Australia. (For those interested in the design, patents are searchable and available in the public domain from the respective patent offices). In short though, the trigger has no sear. Instead is uses a variation of a miniaturized and specially adapted over-center configuration. What this means is that all the force from the firing pin is transferred through the over-center mechanism and anchored at one of the chassis screws. The trigger shoe itself is not “in train” with this load via a sear etc. This means that all the trigger shoe does is push the linkage beyond its tipping point allowing it to collapse and release the firing pin.

The advantages of not having the trigger shoe or a sear in the “load train” means that there is no sear to introduce creep, the trigger weight can be comparatively light and given the mechanics of the trigger, as there is no sear engagement needing incredibly fine clearances and tolerances, the clearances can be slightly larger. This translates into several significant operational benefits. With the above issue of corrosion and dirt in mind, as mentioned, corrosion is largely negated by the materials chosen and the surface/heat treatments used. With the issue of dirt in mind, the slightly larger clearances negate interference fits and drag between moving components. This in turn allows the trigger to run dry. Running dry has the important benefit of minimizing dust and dirt attraction/ingress. In keeping with some other leading Remington Clone competition triggers, this factor means there can be a small lateral movement in the trigger shoe, as the trigger shoe does not “load up” when the action is cocked, nor does it drag (by design) within the mechanism. Many users report that they like this subtilty as it allows for a better tactile preload of the trigger blade.

As mentioned in previous posts, almost all (and possibly all?) other aftermarket triggers require the action to be moved forward in the existing stock or otherwise retrofitted into a new stock. This includes Brix ‘n Andy and Jewell triggers amongst others.

In short, this is a robust mechanism, proven over approximately 10,000 shots with deliberate design elements to allow it to be a drop in fit, resist corrosion, have slightly larger mechanical tolerances to enable dry running, all while by its mechanical design allowing it to be crisp and light in comparison. Is it a $700 Brix ‘n Andy? …no. But it is a $320 (+ postage) drop in trigger which provides both an edge and complements the accuracy of a Barnard action. An action design which has proven itself to be a wonderfully robust and dependable action, which many shooters and armorers respect, know and love. Including me.

Of the initial manufacturing run made, almost all have now been sold, many going to the top tier competitors and beta testers at the fore-front of this project. I have about 10 left at this stage. Given enough interest I will gladly do another production run. Let me know!
marty1000000@hotmail.com


A copy of the manual:
download/file.php?mode=view&id=3101

Cheers,
Marty.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

williada
Posts: 856
Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 12:37 am

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#14 Postby williada » Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:39 pm

Thank you Marty for posting and all the other guys who have added to the discussion.

Craig McGowan
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 11:10 pm
Location: Brisbane
Contact:

Re: Which Barnard aftermarket trigger?

#15 Postby Craig McGowan » Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:27 pm

Afternoon all,

Can I put in my impressions of this trigger. I have two on my barnards, and have been super impressed. For anyone looking to purchase one of these triggers, throw out what you know about Barnards or traditional triggers. These operate on a different principle. The fact that the trigger shoe is not under any load means that the trigger pull is crisp and clean. On my first use I have to admit I struggled after using a barnard trigger for sometime, but this only took one sting and I was back into the groove. I am now looking to further refine the adjustments to suit my shooting style, but already I cannot rate this trigger highly enough.


Return to “Equipment & Technical”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ozfarm and 13 guests